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Posts by: Corbett Barr

Cofounder and CEO of Fizzle. Entrepreneur for a decade. Blogger, podcaster, lifestyle business builder.

Small businesses live and die by what our customers think of us. Staying intimately connected to your customer base isn't just advised, it's essential to your very survival. On The Fizzle Show, we often recommend talking with customers frequently, through both in-depth one-on-one interviews, responsive and frequent email conversations, and through surveys.

If you consider yourself a generalist, here's the good news: doing great work in the future will require the skills of a generalist, especially if you work independently or on a small team. And more and more of us are working independently these days. 40% of American workers will be freelancers by 2020 (and according to Freelancer's Union, 33% of us already are) and freelancers need to be generalists to be successful. You have to know a little bit of everything.

Blogging has been one of the most valuable things I've ever done in my life. As I said back in August (when I wrote Should I Start a Blog?), I don’t know of many other ways to spend your time that can lead to a bigger impact or payoff.

The Fizzle team has been hyper-focused on growth over the past month, and we're seeing encouraging results. As a team, we select a different "theme" each quarter to guide our project work. Our current theme is simply membership growth. We always care about growth, but these themes give us a chance to turn all our attention to one specific thing for a while to make new breakthroughs.

Try this to find out what people are thinking: start typing a question into the Google search box. Something like “where does” or “why can’t” or “how come” — anything that starts with a question word.

I’m decompressing from the World Domination Summit, trying to piece together the themes from this year, and understand what I'll take away long-term. The older I get, and the longer I've been an entrepreneur, the more I keep asking myself “what’s the point?” As in, what’s the point of goals we work towards, and accomplishments we hold up and celebrate in ourselves and others?